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In this Wednesday, March 26, 2014 photo, Chet Kanojia, the founder and CEO of Aereo, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, in New York. The future of Aereo, an online service that provides over-the-air TV channels, hinges on a battle with broadcasters that goes before the U.S. Supreme Court in late April 2014. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Aereo CEO speaks on future of company, challenge by broadcasters in Supreme Court
A videojournalist sets up outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, April 22, 2104. The court is hearing oral arguments between Aereo, Inc., an Internet startup company that gives subscribers access to television on their laptops and other portable devices and the over-the-air broadcasters. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)
Grappling with changing technology, Supreme Court hears copyright challenge to streaming TV      More..
FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2014 file photo, a smoker demonstrates an e-cigarette in Wichita Falls, Texas. Soon, the Food and Drug Administration will propose rules for e-cigarettes. The rules will have big implications for a fast-growing industry and its legions of customers. (AP Photo/Wichita Falls Times Record News, Torin Halsey, File)
Electronic cigarette biz awaits federal rules that will likely curb marketing, set standards      More..
FILE - This July 7, 2010 file photo shows Barry Diller  at the annual Allen & Co. Media summit in Sun Valley, Idaho. Thirty years after failing to persuade the Supreme Court of the threat posed by home video recordings, big media companies are back at the high court to try to rein in another technological innovation that they say threatens their financial well-being. The battle has moved out of viewers’ living rooms, where Americans once marveled at their ability to pop a cassette into a recorder and capture their favorite programs or the game they wouldn’t be home to see. Now the entertainment conglomerates that own U.S. television networks are waging a legal fight, with Supreme Court argument on Tuesday, against a start-up business that uses Internet-based technology to give subscribers the ability to watch programs anywhere they can take portable devices. The source of the companies’ worry is Aereo Inc., which takes free television signals from the airwaves and sends them over the Internet to paying subscribers in 11 cities. Aereo, backed by media billionaire Barry Diller, has plans to more than double that total. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
Will Aereo fly? Broadcasters' copyright challenge to TV over Internet reaches Supreme Court      More..
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